July 16, 2024

I’M LEAVING: SEATTLE SEAHAWKS SHOOTING GENO SMITH HAS SIGNED UP A CONTRACT TO LEAVE SEATTLE SEAHAWKS AND PLAY FOR ANOTHER TEAM…

One of the positive implementations from the NFL in recent seasons is the replay assistance program, which has helped expedite on-field decisions without causing extended game disruptions. Thanks to a rule change at the annual league meeting in Orlando, replay assistance powers have been strengthened.

Effective this season, replay assist can advise on called intentional grounding, roughing the passer, and hits out of bounds penalties. However, what they still can’t do is reverse non-calls into penalties. Here’s a little more background from ESPN:

The NFL will now allow replay officials to move into the area of penalty enforcement for the first time. They will not be allowed to initiate a formal review on intentional grounding, roughing the passer or hits out of bounds. Nor can they suggest a flag be thrown. But they will be authorized to suggest a real-time reversal of a penalty on “specific, objective aspects of a play when clear and obvious video evidence is present,” according to the rule. Previously, replay officials advised officials on calls such as catch/no-catch, possession and down by contact, advice that on-field referees can accept or reject.

It’s good that bogus roughing the passer penalties and “wasn’t actually out of bounds” roughness calls can be reversed, but the inability to turn no-calls into penalties still feels like a legitimate issue when those infractions aren’t subject to formal reviews.

Seattle Seahawks fans may recall this egregious missed intentional grounding call on Carson Wentz back in the 2020 season. The Philadelphia Eagles would eventually score a touchdown on this drive when they should’ve been staring at a 2nd and 40. Under the new rules, this missed call still can’t be overturned to a flag by replay officials.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *